Talk To Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. But, have people quit drug abuse through this?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. In came strange humour and a light, yet energetic approach.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. But the new information being passed is "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

Frank, the new identity for the National Drugs Helpline, was coined by the advertising agency Mother. The idea was to build a reliable "older brother" image that could provide advice to teenagers about banned substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Many people have high regard for the YouTube spoof videos of Frank too. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Drugs instruction has progressed significantly since Nancy Reagan, and in the UK, the cast of Grange Hill asked adolescents to "Simply Say No" to drugs, a movement which numerous specialists now considers was counterproductive.


Frank has set the standard, and now most adverts in Europe are using the same format to equip the youth with unbiased facts to help in making their choices. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

In the United States of America, the federal government has spent millions of dollars on a long-running campaign, Above the Influence, that sells positive possibilities to using substances by making use of a combination of funny and cautionary stories. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Around the world, a good number of anti-drug campaigns still use the scare tricks of old, "descent into hell," being one of the most used. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


Frank was ground-breaking and criticised by Conservative politicians at the time because they felt it suggest that there were some good things to go along with all the bad about drugs.


One primary online promotion educated viewers "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. The man in arrears the cocaine advertisement, Matt Powell, then creative director of digital agency Profero, now disbelieves he overvalued the focus span of the ordinary web browser. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. It's confirmed, it contends, that the method works.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


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Services

FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs

  • A website
  • A private phone number, accessible 24 hours a day
  • Email help
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility